And it proves, in the last place, that liberty can have nothing to fear…




And it proves, in the last place, that liberty can have nothing to fear…

And it proves, in the last place, that liberty can have nothing to fear… --Alexander Hamilton

And it proves, in the last place, that as liberty can have nothing to fear from the judiciary alone, but would have every thing to fear from its union with either of the other departments; that as all the effects of such a union must ensue from a dependence of the former on the latter, notwithstanding a nominal and apparent separation; that as, from the natural feebleness of the judiciary, it is in continual jeopardy of being overpowered, awed, or influenced by its co-ordinate branches; and that as nothing can contribute so much to its firmness and independence as permanency in office, this quality may therefore be justly regarded as an indispensable ingredient in its constitution, and, in a great measure, as the citadel of the public justice and the public security.

Alexander Hamilton

Year: 1788
Context: Federalist No. 78
Tags: citadel of the public justice and the public security, dependence of the former on the latter, firmness and independence, indispensable ingredient in its constitution, liberty can have nothing to fear, natural feebleness of the judiciary, nominal and apparent separation



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